Resilience Circles http://localcircles.org small groups for tough times Thu, 24 Jul 2014 18:07:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.8.4 Lakewood CO Spring 2014 Updates http://localcircles.org/2014/04/02/lakewood-co-spring-2014-updates/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=lakewood-co-spring-2014-updates http://localcircles.org/2014/04/02/lakewood-co-spring-2014-updates/#comments Wed, 02 Apr 2014 15:59:47 +0000 http://localcircles.org/?p=5471 The April Resilience Circle will be Wednesday April 2nd from 6 – 8pm (email SustainableEiber@gmail.com for the location). We  will be discussing the  possibility of Sustainable Eiber pursuing 501c3 nonprofit status. This will enable us to apply for grants and could lead to bigger and better things! Lois Witt, our resident ‘legal eagle’ will lead the discussion. Please […]

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The April Resilience Circle will be Wednesday April 2nd from 6 – 8pm (email SustainableEiber@gmail.com for the location). We  will be discussing the  possibility of Sustainable Eiber pursuing 501c3 nonprofit status. This will enable us to apply for grants and could lead to bigger and better things! Lois Witt, our resident ‘legal eagle’ will lead the discussion.

Please bring a dish to share and your brilliant ideas. Friends, family and neighbors welcome.

The March Resilience Circle was  a great success with about 20 people in attendance at the Edgewater Coffee Company. David Braden of the Living Systems (www.livingsystemsinst.org)  Institute gave a great talk about common pesticides that are harmful to bees and what we can do about it in our own yards through his Bee Safe Neighborhoods Project. This is a  popular project for Sustainable Eiber  to focus on in the coming year and hopefully coordinator for this effort will step forward. Please contact Carrie if you want to help, SustainableEiber@gmail.com

A Relaunch of Sustainable Eiber will take place on Thursday, May 1st as part of the Eiber Neighborhood Association’s Annual meeting. The meeting will be at St Paul’s Church, corner of 10th and Garrison at 6pm. This event will focus on getting resident’s input on what issues to focus on in the coming year as well as reaching out and  involving new folks from the neighborhood.

Walking Group - Want some local, sustainability-minded walking buddies? Join these folks from the ‘South of 6th’ neighborhood for a little extra physical activity in the beautiful, calm setting of Belmar Park. Walk at your own pace, bring your pet, walk with a friend/neighbor. They meet in the Belmar Library parking lot Saturday mornings, 9am. For more info contact Jan Teeuwen, 303 453 9993http://southof6thlakewood.com
Recycling  Demo at the Earth Day Celebration -  Due to lack of participation, only about 20% of waste in Colorado is diverted from a landfill to a recycling center .  Other areas in the US achieve percentages like 60+. At Lakewood’s upcoming Earth Day Celebration  (April 19 at the Lakewood Heritage Center) there will be a recycling-themed information booth run totally by neighbors like yourself who are concerned about sustainability. As well as staffing the booth, we are looking for help with developing and presenting  a 15 minute recycling demonstration. If you can help out, contact Dana Gutwein, danabrown9@gmail.com

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New Circle! Duluth, MN http://localcircles.org/2014/03/27/5466/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=5466 http://localcircles.org/2014/03/27/5466/#comments Thu, 27 Mar 2014 18:16:37 +0000 http://localcircles.org/?p=5466 Membership in the new Resilience Circle in Duluth (starting May 5th, 2014) is for those who are coping with the challenges of long-term unemployment (26+ weeks). The learning and mutual aid components of our RC will offer strategies to restore personal well-being and confidence, and ways to improve economic security through freelancing and entrepreneurship. Social […]

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Membership in the new Resilience Circle in Duluth (starting May 5th, 2014) is for those who are coping with the challenges of long-term unemployment (26+ weeks). The learning and mutual aid components of our RC will offer strategies to restore personal well-being and confidence, and ways to improve economic security through freelancing and entrepreneurship. Social action opportunities will be available for those RC members who want to develop a food buying club and a timebank, both of which would serve any resident in the Duluth community and in the surrounding Twin Ports region.

Meetings are hosted at the Duluth Hub, 1001 East 9th Street, Duluth, MN 55805 at 12:15-1:45PM every Monday, except for holidays. Group facilitators and meeting space are sponsored by Clarity Interpreting Services LLC and Sue Hall’s Place To Grow LLC.

For more information, or how to register to attend an upcoming meeting, contact Karen Arthur, info@clarity4all.com

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Get Small to Go Big: How Howard County MD Launched a Transition Initiative http://localcircles.org/2013/10/17/get-small-to-go-big-how-howard-county-md-launched-a-transition-initiative/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=get-small-to-go-big-how-howard-county-md-launched-a-transition-initiative http://localcircles.org/2013/10/17/get-small-to-go-big-how-howard-county-md-launched-a-transition-initiative/#comments Thu, 17 Oct 2013 15:24:31 +0000 http://localcircles.org/?p=5446 “People are so busy and over-committed, but meeting in a home with friends and food to talk informally – that can really be a game-changer.”

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Transition HoCoMargo Duesterhaus has an amazing house. “We have solar PV, solar hot water, rain gardens and rain barrels,” she says. “We did a big rehab a few years ago to put in major insulation, recycled glass counter tops, and lots of other good stuff.”

Creating a low-carbon house was incredibly satisfying. But even a commitment this huge wasn’t enough for Margo. She knew she needed to do more, though for a while she didn’t know what. Eventually, through a community group focused on climate change, she learned about the Transition Initiatives movement. “It sounded perfect,” she explains. “Exactly what I wanted to do.”

But launching an Initiative proved tricky. “Folks from our community group did some online outreach. But it didn’t really take off.”

Eventually, eight members decided to form a small discussion circle together. “We met seven times and talked about the economy, climate change, and peak oil. We thought about our community’s strengths and where the needs are. We talked about supporting each other through mutual aid.”

“Somehow, these seven meetings created enough group cohesion and momentum to really launch the Transition Initiative,” she says. “At the end of the curriculum, everyone had a lot of energy to get it off the ground.”

Margo’s group used the free seven-session Resilience Circle curriculum to focus its meetings. Other discussion circles have used curricula provided by the Northwest Earth Institute. “The important thing is to meet in a small group and get to know each other more personally,” Margo explains.

Nowadays, Transition Howard County has a mailing list of over two hundred people and several vibrant working groups. They organized an energy forum in the spring of 2013, and a green home tour in the fall of 2012 in conjunction with the big DC Solar Homes Tour.

“The tour is fantastic,” Margo reports. “My home was on the tour, and it’s a great chance to get practical with people. They ask about costs, which companies to use, was it worth it? Having these concrete conversations with people allows them to actually envision making changes.”

She adds, “This year, we’re going to go even bigger and have more homes from our area on the tour. And the projects we feature don’t have to be big and expensive – it can just be a bucket catching rain water, or a small container garden.”

Margo is clear that her Transition Initiative had to start small to get big. Lots of other efforts are also using small groups with real success, such as “Mothers Out Front – Mobilizing for a Livable Climate.” Under this umbrella, dozens of house parties have taken place in Massachusetts, where women have met to talk about their concerns about the future.

Andree Zaleska is one of the organizers. “The sense of relief in the room is palpable,” she says of the gatherings. “Many women have been shouldering their fears for themselves and their children alone. The house parties are a chance to talk and vent and be real about how scary climate change is, and they’ve been really successful in engaging women at a new level.”

“Having wine, cheese, and chocolate at the meetings doesn’t hurt either,” she adds.

Margo agrees. “People are so busy and over-committed, but meeting in a home with friends and food to talk informally – that can really be a game-changer,” she explains. “It recharges your batteries instead of draining them. And it can provide the needed energy to make a big splash out in the wider community.”

Email info@localcircles.org for resources for small groups.

 

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How to Win Friends and Influence the New Economy http://localcircles.org/2013/08/27/how-to-win-friends-and-influence-the-new-economy/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=how-to-win-friends-and-influence-the-new-economy http://localcircles.org/2013/08/27/how-to-win-friends-and-influence-the-new-economy/#comments Tue, 27 Aug 2013 13:56:46 +0000 http://localcircles.org/?p=5433 Loneliness is as strong as smoking or alcohol abuse as an indicator of premature mortality. When Lisa Cook found she had no one to help her put her cat down, she decided to act.

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LisaBy Sarah Byrnes
Originally published on Transformation Magazine

No one likes to admit that they are lonely. It’s too embarrassing. When Lisa Cook’s cat had to be put to sleep, she went to the vet alone. “I couldn’t think of a single person to ask to go with me,” she remembers. “It was devastating.”

Strong cultural norms keep us silent about this problem, despite the fact that isolation and loneliness are endemic. According to the General Social Survey, the average American has only two “confidants” – people we can really talk to and rely on – and one in four have none at all.

Loneliness is a strong predicator of premature mortality – as strong as smoking or alcohol abuse. Social connections are a key, but underemphasized, factor in our physical and mental health. But what activists and organizers may not appreciate are the ways in which isolation also undermines the prospects for social and economic change.

In my experience, lonely people are controlled and scared more easily, and they are more inclined to accept the status quo. Isolated individuals have little reason to believe in their own agency. It is only by forming networks and communities built on solidarity that most people can make a difference.

That’s what Lisa did. She got to know her neighbors, she started organizing, and she formed a “resilience circle” to learn from and share with others.

Resilience circles ( also known as common security clubs) are groups of eight to fifteen people who come together for learning, mutual aid and social action. They began forming in the USA in the wake of the 2008 financial meltdown, when the first group began in a church in the Boston neighborhood of Jamaica Plain, hoping to understand what was happening to the economy.

They learned how members of the group were impacted personally by the crisis, and their meetings quickly turned into brainstorming sessions about the different ways they could help each other. As a result, the age-old practice of “mutual aid” was reborn in their congregation. Since then, hundreds of Circles have met across the country, using the free resources provided by theResilience Circle Network.

In the current, broken economy, most of us rely on money, corporations, and technology to fulfill our needs. We depend on distant, complex systems to fill our supermarkets and our gas stations. Disruptions to these systems, which will become increasingly common because of climatic and financial instability, can be catastrophic to communities. That’s why the task of building more resilient systems is so important.

Resilience circles help to build these systems by allowing us to relearn the practice of mutual aid, which many of us have forgotten in the current “you’re on your own” economy. Participants write their “gifts” – the things they can offer to others – on one set of note cards, and their needs on another.

In the circle I belong to, one woman started the conversation by offering to help with bicycle repairs, and mentioning that she’d like to be able to hem her own pants. Two other members said that they’d like to learn to sew, and then a third woman offered to run a sewing class for the group. Moments later, I was scheduling a time for the pastor of the church to cut my hair. A dog-sitting and child-care exchange also began to bud. People began brainstorming about how to find and share a 20-foot ladder that they needed.

After this exchange, people – often – leave the room with a new sense of wealth and abundance. They see that when they pool their resources – their stuff and their skills – they are much stronger than when they act alone. They may know this in theory already, but the exchanges in the circle give them a taste of how sharing and co-operation actually work in practice.

These intimate exchanges lie at the heart of the circle. The experience also allows people to envision change on a much larger scale. They see that it is possible to shift the balance from relying on money and corporations to relying on people and their skills. They can imagine a system of resilient, interconnected communities, and a new economy characterized by ecological balance, living democracy and an equitable distribution of resources.

Resilience circles are only one place where people are experimenting with building a new economy. According to political economist Gar Alperovitz, the new economy is “just beneath the surface of traditional media attention. [It has] been gathering force and is about to explode into public consciousness.”

Across the globe, people are building Transition Towns, worker co-operatives, community-owned banks, collaborative forms of consumption, renewable energy systems, community land trusts, farmers’ markets, urban agriculture, peer-to-peer learning networks, alternative currencies, time banks, locally-owned businesses, and other models and experiments.

In the new economy, people make, grow and fix stuff instead of buying it from distance. They borrow and barter what they cannot make for themselves. When they buy, they buy from locally-rooted businesses. People become producers, not just consumers. They participate in creating the economic system that sustains them.

Not only is economic interdependence of this kind necessary to create the world we want, it also transforms many aspects of our personal lives. In the new economy, no one can afford to be isolated. Without fossil fuels, we won’t be able to construct large houses in far-flung suburbs. Many of us will have to live closer together, and do more walking, car-sharing and biking. Without Big Oil and Big Agriculture, we’ll have to collaborate to figure out new regional food and energy systems. With less reliance on technology, we might get together to make more of our own entertainment.

The new economy won’t be built a moment too soon. Our communities will continue to be challenged by the housing crisis, austerity-driven cuts to public services, job market instability, extreme weather, and more. Coping with challenges like these requires strong and resilient communities that can make their own decisions democratically and build shared wealth.

Like many others, Lisa Cook is building the solidarity-based economy in her own backyard. Next time she needs to go to the vet, she’ll have a friend to drive her there, and she’ll be able to offer something in return. The good news is that we can all follow Lisa’s lead by taking small but intentional steps to connect with those around us. Those connections can have a major impact; when taken together, they can put us on the road towards a new, fair, and sustainable economy for all.

For more, you can can listen to Lisa’s story here.

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The “Transition Track” at the Slow Living Summit http://localcircles.org/2013/05/13/the-transition-track-at-the-slow-living-summit/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-transition-track-at-the-slow-living-summit http://localcircles.org/2013/05/13/the-transition-track-at-the-slow-living-summit/#comments Mon, 13 May 2013 18:52:09 +0000 http://localcircles.org/?p=5414 Thursday, June 6 10:30 – 12:00 Workshop: Introduction to Transition, with Tina Clarke & Paul LeVasseur 3:45 – 5:15 Workshop: Transition Across Race & Class, with Carlos Espinoza-Toro & Orion Kriegman 7:00 – Transition Gathering, Centre Congregational Church, 193 Main Street Friday, June 7 8:30 – 10:00 Transition Plenary, featuring Tina Clarke, Gus Speth & Chuck Collins […]

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Thursday, June 6

10:30 – 12:00 Workshop: Introduction to Transition, with Tina Clarke & Paul LeVasseur

3:45 – 5:15 Workshop: Transition Across Race & Class, with Carlos Espinoza-Toro & Orion Kriegman

7:00 – Transition Gathering, Centre Congregational Church, 193 Main Street

Friday, June 7

8:30 – 10:00 Transition Plenary, featuring Tina Clarke, Gus Speth & Chuck Collins

10:30 – 12:00 Workshop: Transition Visioning Game, with Steve Chase, Sarah Harpster, & Katy Locke

1:45 – 3:00 Workshop: Emergency Preparedness and Regional Planning, with Conrad Willeman, Chuck Collins, & Sarah Byrnes

3:25 – Summing Up Plenary, including a “Transition Caucus”

Saturday, June 8

12:00 – 4:00 Meeting of the Resilience & Transition Hub, Centre Congregational Church, 193 Main Street

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What if we all enjoyed meaningful social connections? http://localcircles.org/2013/05/06/what-if-we-all-enjoyed-meaningful-social-connections-resilience-circle-facilitator-lisa-cook-at-tedx-mahtomedi/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=what-if-we-all-enjoyed-meaningful-social-connections-resilience-circle-facilitator-lisa-cook-at-tedx-mahtomedi http://localcircles.org/2013/05/06/what-if-we-all-enjoyed-meaningful-social-connections-resilience-circle-facilitator-lisa-cook-at-tedx-mahtomedi/#comments Mon, 06 May 2013 13:35:49 +0000 http://localcircles.org/?p=5404 Watch Resilience Circle facilitator Lisa Cook’s excellent TEDx Talk! Lisa talks about the increasing problem of American loneliness and isolation, including her own personal story. Around 6:40 into the video, she talks about how Circles can help folks create community.

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Watch Resilience Circle facilitator Lisa Cook’s excellent TEDx Talk! Lisa talks about the increasing problem of American loneliness and isolation, including her own personal story. Around 6:40 into the video, she talks about how Circles can help folks create community.

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What is “Community Resilience”? http://localcircles.org/2013/05/01/what-is-community-resilience/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=what-is-community-resilience http://localcircles.org/2013/05/01/what-is-community-resilience/#comments Wed, 01 May 2013 20:50:20 +0000 http://localcircles.org/?p=5396 In the coming months, we’ll be looking for input about what defines “community resilience.” What indicators would you use to measure it? How close is your community to achieving it? If you have thoughts about this question, please post them in the comments here, or email info@localcircles.org.

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In the coming months, we’ll be looking for input about what defines “community resilience.” What indicators would you use to measure it? How close is your community to achieving it? If you have thoughts about this question, please post them in the comments here, or email info@localcircles.org.

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Take the Transition Challenge http://localcircles.org/2013/05/01/take-the-transition-challenge/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=take-the-transition-challenge http://localcircles.org/2013/05/01/take-the-transition-challenge/#comments Wed, 01 May 2013 20:10:52 +0000 http://localcircles.org/?p=5364 During the month of May, join thousands of people across the US taking action to rise to the challenge of food, water, and energy independence. Thousands of landscapes and homes will be transformed, retrofitted and revitalized as part of the Transition Challenge. Thousands of us will take to the streets, the garden, schoolyard, home, apartment […]

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Transition-Challenge-LogoDuring the month of May, join thousands of people across the US taking action to rise to the challenge of food, water, and energy independence.

Thousands of landscapes and homes will be transformed, retrofitted and revitalized as part of the Transition Challenge. Thousands of us will take to the streets, the garden, schoolyard, home, apartment and city hall to take actions big and small. We will grow food, conserve water, save energy and build community. Amidst a dizzying array of crises and mounting despair, together we will bring the hope of transition and show what we are capable of with our heads, hearts and hands aligned in action. It’s time for action, rooted in a shared vision and voice.

Read more and Register Your Action here!

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New Circle Forming in Portland, ME http://localcircles.org/2013/05/01/new-circle-forming-in-portland-me/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=new-circle-forming-in-portland-me http://localcircles.org/2013/05/01/new-circle-forming-in-portland-me/#comments Wed, 01 May 2013 19:44:10 +0000 http://localcircles.org/?p=5393 Join us on May 10, 2013 for an Introductory Session! Justice In the Body 47 Portland Street, second floor Portland, ME  04103 Friday May 10th, 2013 from 7pm to 8:30pm Group will choose time/day of the week for seven session program starting sometime in June. I will send an update when that is decided. People […]

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Join us on May 10, 2013 for an Introductory Session!

Justice In the Body
47 Portland Street, second floor
Portland, ME  04103

Friday May 10th, 2013 from 7pm to 8:30pm

Group will choose time/day of the week for seven session program starting sometime in June. I will send an update when that is decided. People interested in joining a circle and not able to attend this intro session can email Mo Bankey at 8petalsportland@gmail.com for more information and to get involved.

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“Camp Commons: Building Community Resilience” – An Activist Family Camp, July 7 – July 14 http://localcircles.org/2013/04/30/campcommons/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=campcommons http://localcircles.org/2013/04/30/campcommons/#comments Tue, 30 Apr 2013 20:28:48 +0000 http://localcircles.org/?p=5309 Read about Camp Commons 2014 at the New England New Economy Transition Site. —————————————————————————————————————————– Camp Commons 2013: TELLING THE NEW STORY Facing the Future, Building Hope: Concrete Tools for Community Resilience Sunday July 7 through Sunday July 14, 2013 World Fellowship Conference Center White Mountains near Conway, New Hampshire Come for the week! Or come […]

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Read about Camp Commons 2014 at the New England New Economy Transition Site.

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Camp Commons 2013:

WFC

TELLING THE NEW STORY
Facing the Future, Building Hope: Concrete Tools for Community Resilience

Sunday July 7 through Sunday July 14, 2013
World Fellowship Conference Center
White Mountains near Conway, New Hampshire

Come for the week! Or come for a couple of days!

Join a group of fun and engaged activists for the joy of exploration, singing, rethinking, dancing, laughter, eating, sharing skills and organizing strategies, and more singing, storytelling and game playing.

A multi-generational week-long summer camp for community resilience activists working on economic, ecological and social justice, strengthening the commons, community resilience and the transition to the new economy.

Register now!
Click here to book your accommodations directly with World Fellowship, then email the dates of your stay to info@localcircles.org.

  • To build community among activists and cultural workers from different areas, bringing our whole families together
  • To learn from one another in a relaxed and natural setting
  • To celebrate our work and tap into our creativity and humor to strengthen our morale for the struggles ahead

ORGANIZED by the New England Community Resilience Building Network, with help from the Institute for Policy Studies and World Fellowship

Location

World Fellowship Center, Near Conway New Hampshire and the White Mountain National Forest. Founded in 1941, during the war, with motto: “In a time of war, prepare for peace.” World Fellowship has a rich history of political and cultural resistance, the “Highlander Center” of the Northeast.

Basics

  • Sunday through Sunday, including full weekend for those who can’t come for whole week. Come when you can, leave when you must.
  • Activities for children and young people during the day
  • Morning Workshops (political discussions, presentations)
  • Afternoon Recreation, Creativity and Open Space (Hiking, Games, Craft projects, Napping, Excursions, Swimming)
  • Evening Programs – Speakers/Presentations/Discussion, Fun night, Story telling slam)
  • Mealtimes – self organized topic tables
  • Late Night: Dancing, games, celebration, sleep.

Questions? For questions about logistics and lodging, contact World Fellowship directly at (603) 447-2280 or reservations@worldfellowship.org.

ABOUT WORLD FELLOWSHIP

  • Participants book lodging & logistics directly with WFC – book here
  • There is a craft/arts programming for young people
  • All meals healthy and on site, BYOB
  • Outdoor activities, including bicycle trips, hikes, swimming
  • 2 and half hours from Boston
  • 90 min from Portland, ME (Jet Blue)
  • 2 hours from Manchester, NH (Southwest)
  • WFC can help provide airport transportation

COST & REGISTRATION

Diverse accommodation options: from camping to nice private guest rooms ($46 – $80 a day, per adult, including 3 meals, meeting rooms, facilities, etc.).

See rate information here.

Book your accommodations directly through WFC here.

PROGRAM

 

DETAILED AGENDA

Camp Commons Schedule

 

Climate Justice
Presentation: Sunday, July 7, 7:30PM
Workshop: Monday, July 8, 10:00AM-12:00PM
Janet Redman

What is the current science of climate change? What is the state of the movements responding to the climate crisis and what can we expect in the coming year? Janet Redman is co-director of the Sustainable Energy and Economy Network, where she provides analysis of international financial institutions’ energy investment and carbon finance activities.

“Daring to Live the Future Now: Thoughts on System Change”
Monday, July 8, 7:30PM
Deborah Frieze

In this era of increasingly complex problems and shrinking resources, can we find meaningful and enduring solutions to the challenges we face today as individuals, communities and nations? Walk Outs are people who bravely choose to leave behind a world of unsolvable problems, scarce resources and destructive individualism. They walk on to the ideas, beliefs and practices that enable them to discover new potential, new gifts, and new possibilities. Through sharing stories, we’ll explore what becomes possible when we walk out of limiting beliefs and walk on to build healthy and resilient communities. Deborah Frieze is a leading thinker and activist in the movement to build a new economy. She is co-author, with Meg Wheatley, of Walk Out, Walk On: A Learning Journey Into Communities Daring to Live the Future Now.

Personal Resilience Workshop: “Hope in the Face of Despair”
Tuesday, July 9, 10:00AM-12:00PM
Samantha Wechsler & Hilary Allen

Based on Joanna Macy’s “Work that Reconnects,” this interactive and participatory workshop will explore what it means to be hopeful in such challenging times. Samantha Wechsler and Hilary Allen are experienced facilitators and trainers from the Boston area.

True Story Theater Workshop
Tuesday, July 9, 2:00–5:00PM
Christopher Ellinger & Anne Ellinger

Join us for an interactive theater workshop with True Story Theater. Chris & Anne will use their unique approach to drama and storytelling to help you tell your story. Christopher Ellinger founded True Story Theater in 2001 to create more dramatically engaging dialogue in organizations and among leaders. Anne Ellinger has been part of True Story Theater from the start. She and husband Christopher (True Story’s Director) are cofounders of Bolder Giving, a national initiative that promotes the stories of extraordinary givers. Workshop also offered on Thursday 2:00-5:00PM.

Introduction to Transition Movement
Presentation: Tuesday, July 9, 7:30PM
Workshop: Wednesday, July 10, 10:00AM-12:00PM
Steve Chase & Dakota Butterfield

Across the U.S. and the U.K., communities are coming together to face climate change and peak oil. Learn about this dynamic movement of local activists building new food systems, transportation, businesses and futures. Steve Chase is the Director of the Environmental Advocacy and Organizing Program at Antioch University New England in Keene, NH. He is author of Letters to a Fellow Seeker: A Short Introduction To The Quaker Way. Dakota Butterfield is a long-time activist and nonviolence trainer from Boston. They are both certified trainers connected to Transition U.S.

The Art of Storytelling for Activists
Talk & Performance: Wednesday, July 10, 7:30PM
Workshop: Thursday, July 11, 10:00AM-12:00PM
Norah Dooley

How can we integrate the art of storytelling and our personal stories into movements for social change? Norah Dooley is a storyteller, critically acclaimed children’s author and educator, and co-founder of massmouth.com, an organization devoted to promoting the art of storytelling.

True Story Theater Workshop
Thursday, July 11, 2:00PM–5:00PM
Christopher Ellinger & Anne Ellinger

See description above. Workshop also offered on Tuesday 2:00-5:00PM.

Stories of Community Resilience
Thursday, July 11, 7:30PM
Carlos Espinoza & Lisa Fernandes

How do we prepare our communities for the dramatic changes in climate and economy that lay ahead? New England activists talk about their local community resilience building activities. Carlos Espinoza is coordinator of the Jamaica Plain New Economy Transition program in Boston (www.jptransition.org). Lisa Fernandes organizes the 1400+ member Portland Maine Permaculture group and is the Director of its non-profit home, the Resilience Hub of Portland.

Organizing A Resilience Circle
Friday, July 12, 10:00AM-12:00PM and 1:00-3:00PM
Sarah Byrnes & Thomas Atwood

Resilience Circles are small groups where people come together to increase their personal security through learning, mutual aid, social action, and community support. This is a workshop for people interested in thinking about resilience, learning about Resilience Circles, or starting a circle in their community. Sarah Byrnes is the coordinator of the Resilience Circle network. Thomas Atwood is a longtime activist and organizer from Redwood City, CA. See www.localcircles.org.

Fun Night Variety Show
Friday, July 12, 7:30PM

Wealth Inequality & the Transition to a New Economy
Saturday, July 13, 10:00-12:00PM
Chuck Collins

The extreme inequalities of wealth and income are thwarting our transition to a new, green and durable economy. How do we make a transition to a new economy that is ecologically sustainable and economically just? Chuck Collins is senior scholar at the Institute for Policy Studies and co-editor of www.inequality.org. His most recent book is 99 to 1: How Wealth Inequality is Wrecking the World and What We Can Do About It.

Story Slam
Saturday, July 13, 7:30PM
Emcees Mary Hannon & Chuck Collins

An evening of stories from participants, emceed by Boston storytellers and activists Mary Hannon & Chuck Collins.

 

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Photo Source: World Fellowship Center.

“Camp Commons: Building Community Resilience” – An Activist Family Camp, July 7 – July 14 is a post on Resilience Circles

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